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growing. we'll have a live update on "good morning america." >>> the search for a missing woman in oakland, california, has led police to a person of interest. they're combing through a fairgrounds after questioning a registered sex offender who dated sandra coke 22 years ago. he was spotted with her on sunday, the day she went missing. he has a long criminal history, that includes kidnapping and rape. and he was previously charged in two murders. >> we have not arrested this person in this case. but we are looking at this person as a person of interest. they have had history of dating. they are known to each other. >> coke is an investigator for the federal public defender's office. her family and friends have put up a $100,000 reward. >>> two college friends of suspected boston marathon bomber dzhokhar tsaranev, face charges for throwing away fireworks and other items they found in tsaranev's dormroom before capture. if crickonvicted, they will spe0 years in prison. >>> the atlantic hurricane season has been fairly quiet so far. but there may be busy months ahead. the forecast is calling
praised essential new book "collision 2012", obama versus romney and the future of elections in america. he joins us now from washington, d.c. dan, what a pleasure. thank you so much for being here on "viewpoint." >> john, thank you. >> john: congratulations to all of the acclaim your book has received. as you know, this weekend in iowa, both santorum and cruz criticized the romney campaign for its use of the catchphrase "you did build that." their argument it was another instance of him cozying up to the rich republicans. was that mitt romney's core problem as you see it? >> well, it was certainly a problem, john, in this respect. governor romney and president obama look at the economy from two totally different perspectives. their life experiences push them in different directions. when governor romney talked about the economy, he often talked about it from the perspective of job creators, whether small business people or larger business owners. he did not talk about the economy in terms of the working people. the people who were working in those factories or in the small businesses.
>>> making news in america this morning -- breaking overnight, a new terror threat, forcing precautions overseas. americans being told to leave another country. >>> wild world. the rain keeps coming in parts of the country. triggering flash floods and the dramatic rescue of a newborn baby. >>> facebook shocker. a woman found dead. the suspect's facebook friends get a look at the crime scene plus a confession. >>> and a man turned a trash dumpster into a home. complete with bed, bathroom, and that's not all. >>> good friday morning. u.s. interests in pakistan are under threat this morning because of new terror fears. the state department is warning americans against travel there. >> they say there's a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, pakistan's second-largest city. abc's kristin fisher joining us on the latest details from overnight. >> reporter: diana, john, the key word is specific. this is a specific threat against the u.s. consulate in lahore, which is why only a handful of emergency personnel have been allowed to stay. all americans are now being urg
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
angry, america. >>> good morning, america. i know some people that are really happy. here are the winning numbers in the lottery. get it out. 5, 25, 30, 58, 59 and the powerball, 32. >> oh. foiled by 32. >> just -- i was just going to say, that 32. >> we were close. line up because we've all gone winless. except for three. two of them coming actually in new jersey. here's one look at little egg harbor. it is in the sandy disaster zone. so, some real joy headed to a place that could use it. meanwhile, our linsey davis tracking the latest overnight from another winning location in the state of new jersey. that's where we find her. south brunswick, the place. linsey davis, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, josh. this is the super stop 'n shop. things opening up here. we were able to talk to one of the employees not too long ago inside. and he was telling us this isn't normally the place that has lottery frenzy. if you wanted to line up for a powerball ticket, there was no line at all. and while he has no idea who purchased that winning ticket, he's convinced som
was a really good friend. next. all throughout high school we hung out. >> heroin's increasing toll on america. and later...? >> in three more years, star trek is going to be celebrating its golden anniversary.,, [ female announcer ] new nature valley soft-baked oatmeal squares. hearty oatmeal now softly baked with a drizzle of cinnamon. it's a brand-new take on a morning classic. soft-baked oatmeal squares. new from nature valley. ♪ you have to let me know [ female announcer ] when sweet and salty come together, the taste is irresistible. sweet and salty nut bars by nature valley. nature at its most delicious. >> osgood: no parents want to believe their child could be hooked on heroin. so it's always a shocking discovery when they find out. it does happen every day and sometimes in places where you would least expect it. our colleagues at "48 hours" have spent the last few months investigating heroin addiction in a small town in illinois. our cover story is reported now by maureen maher. >> it's thursday afternoon in the levy chicago suburb of naperville, illinois. >> i will be home later.
're on day 25 of filner watch. >>> and honoring america's heroes. first responders front and center. >> there is no second chance in if you're late, it will matter. >> country music superstar tim mcgraw and a new program to empower our firefighters and emts. >> share these stories with you. >> mcgraw joins me live, straight ahead. you're live in the cnn "newsroom." >>> good morning to you. thank you so much for being with me. i'm carol costello. no flight data recorders, no communications and no answers. the big question remains this morning, why did a u.p.s. cargo jet crash just before landing in alabama? right now more than 24 hours after the crash, the cockpit and voice recorders have yet to be recovered. both remain inside the still smoldering wreckage. now, the answers may be in those recorde recorders, since there was no communication from the pilots to air traffic control just before the crash and the only clues available are from witnesses. >> when i got up, it just, i just heard like a boom, boom. and i didn't know what it was. i was just staring out the window and i looked
to this year's printer's row literary festival to hear about "the cooked seed." then on to bookexpo be america in new york city city with erica jong who talks about "fear of flying." and we finish with author and radio talk show host larry elder at the los angeles times festival of books as he discusses his memoir about his troubled relationship with his father in "dear father, dear son." booktv in prime time all this week on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: well, with the announcement this week that "the washington post" has been sold to jeff bethos, we thought we'd take this opportunity to look at changes in the newspaper industry and the potential future of the news industry in general. we have two guests joining us this week. first, we want to introduce you to alan mutter. he is in san francisco, and he is a newspaper consultant, he's a lecturer as well at the university of california berkeley on media economics, and he has served as a newspaper editor, a cable tv executive and a tech
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
. those are twot key questions being asked in the wake of major developments on america's crime beat. >> reporter: attorney general eric holder unveiled sweeping new criminal justice reforms saying long prison terms for drug offenses are not making the u.s. safer. >> we need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, to deter, and rehabilitate, but not really to warehouse and to forget. >> reporter: meantime, the federal judge delivered a significant ruling. saying a hard line approach in new york city, a policy, stop and frisk has violated the constitutional rights of minorities. it was a blow for mayor michael bloomberg with far reaching implications. >> if this decision were to stand it would turn those precedents on their head and make our city and in fact the whole country a more dangerous place. >> reporter: the judge appointed a federal monitor saying police discrimination against blacks and latinos was widespread. with hundreds of thousands of innocent people stopped over the last decade. violent crime is down in new york and across the country. but if these tough laws g
"america's got talent" the little dog bailey and dance partner. they will be here live this morning. >>> we do begin this half hour with a close call in california. police say a situation there was milliseconds from tragedy when a scene being shot for a movie got too real. >> reporter: as linda bergsly approached a coffee shop she saw something that made her hair stand on end -- armed, masked men threatening people inside. >> there was a gun. >> reporter: she quickly called 911. >> one pulled the gun out of the pocket. >> reporter: police rushed to the scene, prepared for a potential gun battle. >> by all intents and purposes it was an armed robbery and cops responded as such. >> reporter: an audio device captured what happened next. >> what are you doing? we're shooting a short film. >> after they stripped him the gun, he saw the film crew. >> reporter: the gunman and supposed hostages were actors, shooting an independent film. >> they didn't pull permits and didn't notify the police department. do. of an important thing to >> reporter: but according to the glenn dora city website, the fi
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's exactly right. what's happened is, the united states is perceived as, first of all, tenuous about making decisions. we had what happened in egypt, for example, the administration was really i think very slow and has still been slow to understand the muslim brotherhood was not democratic. we had the president drawing lines
>>> making news in america this morning -- growing pressure. the obama administration says a chemical weapons attack did kill hundreds of people in syria, as the u.s. moves closer to military action. we're live in washington with the latest. >>> gaining ground. firefighters finally making progress on a massive wildfire burning near yosemite national park. but the concern is far from over. >>> subway scare. an elderly man gets his foot stuck in a train door and goes on a terrifying ride. >>> and caught off guard. what question puzzled the beauty pageant contestant, prompting this response -- >> and believing when you see, it's perfect. >>> good tuesday morning, everyone. we begin with the growing crisis in syria and what is increasingly appearing to be an imminent u.s. strike against the assad regime. >> it comes after u.n. weapons inspectors visited the apparent site of a chemical attack last week. and now, this morning, the strongest words yet from a u.s. official. abc's devin dwyer has the latest from washington. good morning, devin. >> reporter: good morning. the strong
news as we cover the lottery drawing. get the latest on "america this morning" and "good morning america." you will be able to find updates on abcnews.com. >> serious breaking news from southern california where residents have been trapped as a dangerous fire out of control. in riverside near banning had to block the else skascape route. one resident and two firefighters hurt. fast moving fire began mid afternoon and spread quickly. eight square miles. abc news is on the scene. we have a full report in our next half-hour. >> also three people suffering minor burns after a gas like sparked a fire on campus of college in suburban philadelphia. construction worker ruptured a 4 inch underground gas line while crews were installing a light post for an athletic complex. >> millions of people in the middle of the country are bracing for a day of wet and wild weather. a deadly rainmaker hovering over kansas and missouri. rapidly rising floodwaters are overtaking communities stranding families and keeping rescuers on the move. abc's ginger zee has more. >> the bank of the river there with
and so much rubble. this is fast becoming a simmering civil war. one of america's great allies in this region, awash in blood. on one side, the government admitted that 36 islamists in its custody were killed. while on the other, militants slaughtered two dozen egyptian police. the main concern as the killing continues is turning this new generation into fighters against not only the egyptian military, but the u.s. as well. martha raddatz. abc news, cairo. >>> olympic printer and double leg amputee, oscar pistorius, will be tried for the murder of his girlfriend next march. one of the developments from pistorius' court appearance yesterday. pistorius admitted to killing reeva steenkamp in february. he says he shot her by accident. pistorius face is a life sentence if convicted. >> now back at home, central idaho, residents are slowly allowed to return to their homes which have been, had been threatened by a fast-moving wildfire. abc's aditi roy is on the fire line. >> reporter: fanned by west winds, the beaver creek fire burns deep in the hills of sun valley, idaho. more than 1
issues. >> this morning on "world news now" -- rich relief. the world meets america's newest millionaire. we have new details about who is taking home one of the jack pots from new jersey. also ahead. >> my main goal for this whole project is to find the real paul. >> the decade old mystery of a missing baby. why this man believed that little boy was him. in an abc news exclusive, barbara walters sits down with the man in the middle of the heartbreaking mix-up. >> then forget about laying on the beach. how about hovering high above it. the newest vacation sensation. it's friday, august 9th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> tgif. can i get a high five. >> yes. >> we feel brown today. i feel like we work for ups or something. >> just need our patches. couple of things to deliver. >> boxes. >> couple boxes. it is friday. perfect way to start friday. starting with a feel good story. >> let's get to it. feel belt irtter if it was me. learning details about one of the winning powerball tick tets. >> but by a group of vehicle workers an
.s. assets, and flatt tells cnbc there continues to be a lot of investment opportunity in america. flatt says he's bullish on the u.s. because housing, retail and manufacturing are all making a comeback, and he sees possibilities in the shale gas revolution. flatt also mentioned he's looking for value plays in europe and emerging markets. it's always fascinating to know how billionaires are investing *their money. insider monkey reveals warren buffett and others are buying shares of davita. the company owns kidney dialysis centers. billionairs are also bullish on sirius satellite radio company verisign. another popular stock with 1-percenters is an internet registry services company. and billionairs are also big on credit card stock visa. investors are keeping their eyes on priceline. the stock is closing in on a milestone: $1,000 a share. in its latest earnings, priceline notes "tremendous momentum" going forward. strength in europe helped revenues. noodles and company, which went public earlier this summer, is trading lower after its first set of earnings failed to increase investor appet
and how we can bring our a game to the table every day to serve america's communities that have many times too little access to health care. so i wanted to welcome you all to the room and welcome senator ben cardin to the room who is no stranger to baltimore medical since and has been around i got here, and that is like 300 years ago. senator was at the very beginning of a great assist to baltimore medical system when we had our help waiver. we had a medicare demonstration project for many years, and every time it looked like it was going to end or expire come -- the senator could be counted on to not only sure it will be realistic but to renew the effort to make sure that happened. when we wanted to build a brand- new building, he was the first one i came to see. which started the conversation when he was on one side of the hill and ended the conversation on the other side of the hill because it took that long for us to get the job done but the senator was responsible for the first public money coming into this venture that eventually grew into the building you were all sitting in now. fo
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
's the chart. as josh brown pointed out this morning, for those who were -- thought this bet on america, on an american recovery was misguided -- >> or naive. >> slammed it in their face. stock's up 31% this year. >> to go back to the point as well, book value which buffett likes to use, up 2% for the quarter. in a period where travelers, some of the other big insurance competitors suffered because of their exposure to what was happening in the bond market. buffett what does he do? he buys companies. concentrated stakes in equities which did well in the second quarter and that helped outperform a the lot of his peers. >> buy a railroad, utility company in nevada hoping on recovery from recession there. big mac cr macro bets. >> tyson food, 69 cents, beat business 9 cents. revenue a beat. chicken and beef volume, up 4%, hard to do in this in economy. >> especially with beef prices the way they are. >> interesting you mention that. chicken feed costs up $105 million in the quart, less than 335 in the first half. the thinking is, they're looking at commodity costs coming down, even as pric
family. see the obama's new, adorable puppy. >> america's favorite mini-commander-in-chief. landing a big scoop and pretty coveted kiss. all ahead in "the skinny." it's tuesday, august 20th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> good tuesday morning. we are going to begin this half hour with news of a significant arrest in egypt. spiritual leader of the muslim brotherhood in police custody. >> this comes as the u.s. is considering its options in the region. abc's karen travers joining us from washington with more on this. karen? >> reporter: good morning, diana. good morning, john. secretary of defense chuck hagel admitted yesterday there isn't much the u.s. can do right now. this is up to the egyptian people. an uneasy calm in egypt, a break from the horrific violence last week. but a brazen daylight attack in the sinai peninsula. militants ambushed two buses carrying off duty police officers forced them to lie on the ground before they shot them 25 were killed. here in washington the obama administration is anxiously monitoring the s
-man, captain america and batman work for sundland window cleaning. the company is donating time and the costumes. wearing the mask means you have to think quick. kids have a lot of questions. >> who is the easiest guy to take down? >> hmm, the joker. >> the joker. >> reporter: when you are chronically ill it forces you grow up. the job of healing and recovery can be pretty intense when confined in a hospital for weeks even months. so a superhero distraction like this reminds kids that, well, they're just kids. >> there is research done on laugher and how it helps the body heal. watching the kids out here down and talking with the superheroes, i think that's exactly what was going on. >> reporter: little abby can't help but feel there is nothing she can't d i love to see her smile. >> abby didn't like that mom was facing the camera. mom, mom. >> therapeutic for kids and parents. >> yeah. >> that's wonderful. >>> we want to tell you, next week, national dog day monday. we want to help you show off your best friend. theut p it should be a lot of fun. e-mail us at wnnfans.com. inclu
boy. but anyway, this was actually -- you know, mika, you were probably too young, but america stopped, actually. >> absolutely. >> america stopped and it was -- there was something shocking about a man playing a woman in tennis. >> a man getting his butt kicked. >> well because -- >> yeah. >> joe -- >> paid off. by the way -- >> time to move on -- >> we should have seen this. >> the last gasp of the republican party, right? >> should have seen this a mile away. >> the republican party? >> they don't like women, right? >> it was rigs. >> the only guy -- the only way they could beat a man was if he threw the match, right? >> joe, you're missing a wild -- >> i'm hearing it, but, howard, proves once and for all, the hate mail on twitter today is a marxist because everything, absolutely everything, goes back to politics for marxists. all right. there we go. >> joe calls howard marksesist on -- >> don't -- marxist, everything goes back to politics. >> i don't know no. >> i'm not talking about your ideology but the tennis match and you bring it back to republicans. >> miley cyrus. >> come on
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
of the march on washington. during his remarks he called on america kind of to in his words he said to take on the great unfinished business of the march and he was talking about addressing income disparity, that was one of his big i think themes of the speech. what do you think the big takeaways were of his remarks? a lot of people were waiting to hear what we to say. >> largely will you view this through the prism of your own life and experience. democrats are going to view it differently than republicans, white americans view it differently than african-americans. common things i talked to at the march is they found it less personal and more political than they anticipated. the president only made a brief reference talking about the advancement of african-americans in politics and talked about state government, city government, congress, he said yes, even the white house now. the back half of the speech was about income and equality, education and equality. the president making his case that the country must do more, he needs help from outside washington. that was a key point. change doe
turned down opportunities in the land down under to play america's pastime in the sooner state. 9,000 miles away. >> and it was a choice that he'd made when he was about 15 that that's what he wanted to do. >> reporter: jones, the oldest of the three suspects, is being held on a $1 million bond. luna, who is believed to have fired the gun, and edwards who prosecutors say laughed during his arrest, will be tried as adults. >> the family in australia, they're hurting. i'm hurting the same way. i don't cry on the outside. i'm crying right here from the heart right now. >> as lane's family prepares to bring him home his death has touched a nerve worldwide. the former australia deputy prime minister is even calls on tourists to boycott the u.s. to send a message about gun control. charlie, gayle? >> michelle miller, thank you. >>> a potential 2016 presidential candidate is defending himself this morning over his citizenship. jan crawford is outside the canadian embassy in washington. jan, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. good morning, gayle. tex
affects more than 70 million people in north america today-- 40 million men and 30 million women. that's a lot of people. some people try products that claim to regrow hair only to find out a few hundred dollars later that they didn't work. don't waste your money on unproven remedies. if you care about how you look and you want to get your hair back, take time to listen to world-renowned hair loss expert dr. jon gaffney, medical director of hair club, a board-certified plastic surgeon, and member of the american medical association. >> hair loss for both men and women is more common than you think. by the age of 50, half the adult population experiences hair loss. many of us in the medical community expect this trend to increase over time, in part due to such things as stress, poor nutrition, fad diets, and certain prescription medication. hair loss is different for men and women. male pattern hair loss is the most common hair loss for men, representing more than 90% of all male cases in north america. it occurs due to the chemical dihydrotestosterone, commonly known as d.h.t. d.h.t. c
not? >> got to go in. >> come on rob, get it in there to get three points. >> one point. >> america is still learning the beautiful game. >> that will help. >> coming up next, economist dr. jeffe jeffery sacks joins us and bill bratton and nbc political director chuck todd. >> chuck winked at you. >> oh, god. >> wink again. >> the winker. >> he just did. >> and, of course, the great andrea mitchell. >> she's great. >> "morning joe" back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for
1% of his personal fortune. as our jim acosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's "newsroom." >> reporter: watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> reporter: but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned the "washington post" led by its publisher, kathryn graham, now that leg gas sin the future of one of the most important newspaper rests in the hands of one billionaire, amazon founder, jeff bezos, a stunning $250 million deal that gives an all new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> reporter: the post now follows other major newspapers. "wall street journal" bought by conservative media titan robert murdoch and "boston globe" purchased by red sox owner john henry to be snatched up by the super wealthy and perhaps the "new york times" could land in the portfolio of libertarian billi billionaires, robert and charles cope. >> i think it's not exactly new. >> reporter: william hearst came from family that made its fortune mining. the classi
'll be leaving my job and heading back to congress. >> his head band say good tell, he's got america on his mind, literally. >>> but first for you this morning, breaking news, there is chaos in egypt, deadly clashes overnight between government security forces and supporters of ousted president mohamed morsi. these clashes have left 15 dead, more than 200 injured and those numbers are expected to rise. cnn is covering this story like no other network can, with live team coverage. first let's go to arwa damon, live in the streets of cairo, joining us by phone. arwa, can you hear us? if so, what's the latest? >> reporter: well these clashes are really spreading throughout the entire capital. we were outside around an hour ago when we last talk, the main sit-in site, watching pro-morsi demonstrators, crowds using a bus for cover, trying to move forward on an overpass to join those demonstrators that are at the main sit-in site. now we're in another part of cairo where we saw tear gassing, what sounded like gunshots. this is another area where there is a fairly large crowd of pro-morsi demonstrators
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in the pool of daca applicants. those from central america, asia and europe on the other hand are underrepresented in the pool of applicants so far and for these three groups this underrepresentation is also statistically significant. so just a reminder here i'm going through sort of the top line findings and this discussion hopefully will unpack some of the receipts why. okay. so we can move beyond national origins and this is where i do apologize because this should have been removed because this is all about stroking academic ego but this is just a multivariant regression analysis. this is a way to take all of the data, analyze the data while controlling for other factors. now, underrepresentation is one thing and new or bolstered outreach to those particular national origin groups can correct that underrepresentation but are all groups experiencing daca sort of equally? well another way we can address that question it look at denials. so when we think about approvals versus denials, we can ask ourselves, are any particular groups disproportionately being denied? so this ma
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
a lot because they sell a lot in north america and same with international including china. finally for gm, the important thing to focus on here is that asia is increasingly being driven by the chinese market, and they are putting more of an emphasis on china when it comes to vehicle development. it's a big change from the early 2002 to 2003 when they bought dae woo out of south korea. at that time, keep in mind, 10, 12 years ago, they had very little expertise when it came to small cars. they needed dae woo, and that's a shame and gm is looking at how can it lower its cost and the record is that they are considering lowering production there. >> thanks very much. over to josh lipton for a three market flash. >> free acquisition to tell you about beginning with dole fruit, well in the green. agreed to be taken private by chair and ceo who raised his offer and back in june he over it at $12 a share. also, pin pall foo-- pinnacle fs down. both companies are leading players in the growing field of aviation information management. tyler, back to you. >> all right, thank you very much, j
's just pulled over the man acquitted in one of america's most controversial trials in years. the shooting death of trayvon martin. >> nowhere in particular. >> nowhere in particular? why do you say that? >> you didn't see my name? >> huh? >> you didn't see my name? >> na-uh. what a coincidence. >> reporter: in the two weeks following the florida jury's verdict -- >> not guilty. >> reporter: -- zimmerman had been in hiding. his legal team tells abc news he's apparently on a road trip and also posted on twitter, "for his safety, we won't make any comments about zimmerman's whereabouts, and we will work to protect his privacy. with his conceal and carry permit reinstated, it is legal for the 29-year-old to transport a weapon in most states including texas. what he can't do is speed. zimmerman's brother tweeted "a heavy foot, nothing more. and this officer gave him a break." >> this is a warning for your speed. >> reporter: brandy hitt, abc news, los angeles. >>> today sentencing in cleveland for ariel castro the man charged with kidnapping and torturing three women. he's pled guilty to 937 c
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